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Four Freedoms

Freedom of Speech

Freedom of Speech

Finding new ideas for paintings never came easily but The Four Freedoms were a greater challenge. "It was so darned high-blown," Rockwell said, "Somehow I just couldn't get my mind around it." While mulling it over, Rockwell, by chance, attended a town meeting where one man rose among his neighbors and voiced an unpopular view. That night Rockwell awoke with the realization that he could paint the freedoms best from the perspective of his own hometown experiences using everyday, simple scenes such as his own town meeting.

Freedom of Worship

Freedom of Worship

"Although often darkened or otherwise enhanced in reproduction, Freedom to Worship is composed of soft grays, beiges, and browns and is painted so thinly that the weave of the canvas is visible with no brushstrokes showing. Rockwell may have felt that these stylistic changes in The Four Freedoms were improvements to his regular painting style, reflecting his understanding of the importance of this commission and perhaps his anticipation of the public reaction to the works."

Freedom of Want

Freedom of Want

The Four Freedoms were a phenomenal success. After their publication, the Post received 25,000 requests for reprints. In May 1943, representatives from the Post and the U.S. Department of the Treasury announced a joint campaign to sell war bonds and stamps. They would send the Four Freedoms paintings along with 1,000 original cartoons and paintings by other illustrators and original manuscripts from The Saturday Evening Post on a national tour. Traveling to 16 cities, the exhibition was visited by more than a million people who purchased 133 million dollars in war bonds and stamps.

Freedom of Fear

Freedom of Fear

In his January 1941 address to Congress, Franklin Delano Roosevelt articulated his vision for a postwar world founded on four basic human freedoms-freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom from want and freedom from fear. In 1942, Norman Rockwell was working on a piece commissioned by the Ordnance Department of the U. S. Army a painting of a machine gunner in need of ammunition. Posters of the gunner, titled "Let's give him Enough and On Time," were distributed to ordnance plants throughout the country to encourage production. But Rockwell wanted to do more for the war effort and decided he would illustrate Roosevelt's four freedoms.

Four Freedoms

Freedom of Speech

Freedom of Speech

Finding new ideas for paintings never came easily but The Four Freedoms were a greater challenge. "It was so darned high-blown," Rockwell said, "Somehow I just couldn't get my mind around it." While mulling it over, Rockwell, by chance, attended a town meeting where one man rose among his neighbors and voiced an unpopular view. That night Rockwell awoke with the realization that he could paint the freedoms best from the perspective of his own hometown experiences using everyday, simple scenes such as his own town meeting.

Freedom of Worship

Freedom of Worship

"Although often darkened or otherwise enhanced in reproduction, Freedom to Worship is composed of soft grays, beiges, and browns and is painted so thinly that the weave of the canvas is visible with no brushstrokes showing. Rockwell may have felt that these stylistic changes in The Four Freedoms were improvements to his regular painting style, reflecting his understanding of the importance of this commission and perhaps his anticipation of the public reaction to the works."

Freedom of Want

Freedom of Want

The Four Freedoms were a phenomenal success. After their publication, the Post received 25,000 requests for reprints. In May 1943, representatives from the Post and the U.S. Department of the Treasury announced a joint campaign to sell war bonds and stamps. They would send the Four Freedoms paintings along with 1,000 original cartoons and paintings by other illustrators and original manuscripts from The Saturday Evening Post on a national tour. Traveling to 16 cities, the exhibition was visited by more than a million people who purchased 133 million dollars in war bonds and stamps.

Freedom of Fear

Freedom of Fear

In his January 1941 address to Congress, Franklin Delano Roosevelt articulated his vision for a postwar world founded on four basic human freedoms-freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom from want and freedom from fear. In 1942, Norman Rockwell was working on a piece commissioned by the Ordnance Department of the U. S. Army a painting of a machine gunner in need of ammunition. Posters of the gunner, titled "Let's give him Enough and On Time," were distributed to ordnance plants throughout the country to encourage production. But Rockwell wanted to do more for the war effort and decided he would illustrate Roosevelt's four freedoms.

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