T

Serif

“A serif is the little extra stroke found at the end of main vertical and horizontal strokes of some letterforms.”

San-Serif

“The removal of the serifs lead to the creation of a whole new kind of typeface, the San-Serif, meaning 'without' a serif."

Y

Hairline

“A hairline is the thinnest stroke found in a specific typeface that consists of strokes of varying widths.”

Arm

“The arm of a letter is the horizontal stroke on some characters that does not connect to a stroke or stem at one or both ends.”

P

Bowl

“The curved part of the character that encloses the circular or curved parts (counter) of some letters such as d, b, o, D, and B is the bowl.”

A good way to remember this is that it looks like a bowl when deconstructed.

O

Counter

“The enclosed or partially enclosed circular or curved negative space (white space) of some letters such as d, o, and s is the counter.”

Dotted Zero

Adding a dot in the letter O can sometimes be the only characteristic that differentiates it from looking like the letter O and the number 0

G

Spur

“A small projection off a main stroke is called a spur.”

It’s a small detail, but adds a lot of character to the letter G

R

Leg

“The lower, down sloping stroke of the K and k is called a leg. The same stroke on R as well as the tail of a Q is sometimes also called a leg.”

The removal of the leg can sometime lead to the formation of a different letter with similar structure.

A

Apex

“The point at the top of a character such as the uppercase A where the left and right strokes meet is the apex. The apex may be a sharp point, blunt, or rounded and is an identifying feature for some typefaces.”

The removal of the leg can sometime lead to the formation of a different letter with similar structure.

P

Bowl

“The curved part of the character that encloses the circular or curved parts (counter) of some letters such as d, b, o, D, and B is the bowl.”

A good way to remember this is that it looks like a bowl when deconstructed.

H

Crossbar

“The (usually) horizontal stroke across the middle of uppercase A and H is a crossbar. The horizontal or sloping stroke enclosing the bottom of the eye of an e is also a crossbar. ”

“Although often used interchangeably, the crossbar differs from an arm and a cross stroke because each end connects to a stem or stroke and doesn’t (usually) intersect/cross over the stem or stroke”

Y

Hairline

“A hairline is the thinnest stroke found in a specific typeface that consists of strokes of varying widths.”

Arm

“The arm of a letter is the horizontal stroke on some characters that does not connect to a stroke or stem at one or both ends.”

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